Using Twitter Effectively: Part 3 of 10 – Building a Meaningful Following

Nat Russo How-To, Twitter, Writing 11 Comments

[UPDATED 8/16/2014] Welcome back to my ten-part series on Using Twitter Effectively. In yesterday’s post I began to touch on the subject of building a meaningful following. In today’s post, part 3 of 10, I’m going to offer more ways to build and manage that following. It’s not enough to simply have a lot of followers. Those followers need to be engaging, supportive, and contributors in their own right.  

Nat RussoUsing Twitter Effectively: Part 3 of 10 – Building a Meaningful Following

Using Twitter Effectively: Part 2 of 10 – Building a Meaningful Following

Nat Russo How-To, Twitter, Writing 9 Comments

Twitter is one of the many marketing tools writer’s need to get comfortable with if they wish to build that coveted Writer’s Platform, and in yesterday’s post I covered the basics of getting started. Now that you’ve filled out your bio and uploaded a good profile picture, where do you go next? Twitter isn’t going to help you much if you don’t have followers, so today I’m going to shed some light on how to build a meaningful Twitter following. Remember, Twitter isn’t just about the numbers, even though it may sometime seem that way. Let’s get started!

Nat RussoUsing Twitter Effectively: Part 2 of 10 – Building a Meaningful Following

Using Twitter Effectively: Part 1 of 10 – The Basics

Nat Russo How-To, Twitter, Writing 25 Comments

[UPDATED 05/09/2014] Twitter is, arguably, the most far-reaching social platform in the world. But the overwhelming majority of users don’t know how to use it effectively. Worse, they abuse it and risk getting shackled with a poor reputation that can be difficult to change.  With the right tools and techniques, Twitter can help you build a stable writer’s platform that allows you to reach tens of thousands of people with a single click. Awesome power. But, as the saying goes, “with great power comes great responsibility.” Even if you’re not a writer, I believe you’ll find most of these techniques invaluable. In this 10-part series, spread out over the next ten days, I’ll cover the following Twitter basics: What To Do Part …

Nat RussoUsing Twitter Effectively: Part 1 of 10 – The Basics

“Yes, but” or “No, and” – End Writer’s Block

Nat Russo Basics, How-To, Plot and Structure, Scene Structure, Story Ideas, Writing 12 Comments

Writer’s Block. Two of the most dreaded words in a writer’s vocabulary…at least when put together in that order.  You stare at the blank page, and it stares back. It’s taunting you. It’s telling you you’re no good. You’re just about to slam the lid on your laptop shut when you remember something crucial: “Writing is a learned craft, not a mystical gift from the universe.” (I think I’ve heard that somewhere before…) A craft? A learned craft? Yes. And don’t you forget it! Now click the link and read on. Let’s get rid of that pesky writer’s block using tried and true elements of the craft!

Nat Russo“Yes, but” or “No, and” – End Writer’s Block

How Do You Come Up With Story Ideas?

Nat Russo Basics, How-To, Idea Net, Story Ideas, Writing 27 Comments

Perhaps another way to phrase this question is “where do story ideas come from?” The answer is simple: story ideas are all around us.  Everything we see, touch, smell, hear, and taste has the potential to be a story seed that blossoms into a full-fledged story if nurtured properly. For some of us, this nurturing process is intangible, defying attempts to be described or squeezed into a bullet list. But for most, full story ideas aren’t something that spring up like eureka moments. Instead, the full story only emerges after idea “seeds” are watered and nurtured. I’m one of the latter. Rather than waiting for the mysterious process by which a story miraculously springs into existence in the rusty innards …

Nat RussoHow Do You Come Up With Story Ideas?

How Do You Find a Character’s Voice?

Nat Russo Characterization, How-To, Voice, Writing 33 Comments

Finding a character’s voice and personality comes easy to some, and with difficulty to others. In fact, even for those of us who don’t struggle with this issue, some characters are just more enigmatic than others. So what can you do? In a couple of #writetip auto-tweets that I send out periodically (we’ll debate the merits of auto-tweeting later) I mention a process of interviewing your characters to get at the heart of that person’s character traits. I’ve received an enormous response to those tweets asking me to go into some detail, so I decided to write today’s blog entry on that subject. In the past, I’ve taken a number of approaches to this problem that usually wind up being …

Nat RussoHow Do You Find a Character’s Voice?

The Basics: So You Want To Write A Novel

Nat Russo Basics, Characterization, How-To, Plot and Structure, Reference Books, World Creation, Writing 10 Comments

Where Do I Begin? If you’ve landed here, you’ve got a good head start. I’m going to make a couple of assumptions about you, if that’s ok: You’re an avid reader. You want to write a book-length work of fiction (i.e. you want to write a novel). You’ve never done this before, or you’ve had a lot of starts/stops in your past. You’re willing to dedicate the next several months…perhaps years…of your life to telling a single story. You have no idea where to begin.   You may think I’m a mind reader now. But the simple truth is that I’ve just described most of us. And by “us” I’m referring to pretty much anyone who has ever taken the first …

Nat RussoThe Basics: So You Want To Write A Novel

Revising Your First Draft: The First Read-Through

Nat Russo Basics, Editing, How-To, Revision, Writing 37 Comments

[Revised 02/10/2015] What have I gotten myself into? If you’re in the middle of your first draft, you’ve probably asked yourself that question several times by now. Writing that first draft can feel like running a sprint at times. Your head is full of ideas for setting, characterization, dialog, plot, and interesting scenes. Thoughts are flowing so fast that your fingers can’t keep up. Putting the words on paper is like a mental dump of information. Did you capture it all? Did you get that last thought translated from brain signals to keyboard strokes? You’re not certain, but if you stop to look back you just might miss that next thought that’s bubbling to the surface.  

Nat RussoRevising Your First Draft: The First Read-Through